The Scar-crow Men

The Scar-crow Men

Book - 2011
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Supernatural action and adventure meets brilliantly researched historical fiction in the second novel in the genre- busting Swords of Albion trilogy. 1593. Walsingham has been dead for two years and a new mood of suspicion and mistrust sweeps through England's network of spies. No one feels safe. Even the great Will Swyfte must watch his back. Then Will's best friend, playwright and spy Kit Marlowe is accused of being a double agent and Will knows he must act... but too late, Marlowe is killed in a pub brawl that has all the hallmarks of an assassination. Going in search of Marlowe's killer, Will discovers that key members of England's ruling class, including many of Walsingham's men, are not who they claim to be: they look -- and act -- the same but they are changelings, straw men brought to hideous life through the vile magick of the Unseelie Court. In an atmosphere of growing paranoia, Will is branded a traitor and goes on the run.

The glass has turned: he must uncover the true nature of this supernatural conspiracy or the executioner's block awaits. Will Swyfte -- swordsman, adventurer, scholar, rake, and the greatest of Elizabethan England's new breed of spy -- and his comrades in covert arms must once again venture forth into the dark, deadly world of the vengeful Unseelie folk in defence of Queene and Countrie!
Publisher: London : Bantam, ©2011.
ISBN: 9780593062517
0593062515
Characteristics: 491 pages ;,24 cm.

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bibliofinn
Aug 18, 2011

Brilliant, and ever darker sequel to Chadbourn's earlier novel, Albion's Sword. The hero, Will Swyfte, is idolised as "England's Greatest Spy" by the common people, hiding in plain sight from the supernatural enemies who threaten Queen Elizabeth's throne. Lurking in the background are the creepy spymasters like Walsingham and Cecil, who are deeply compromised and soaked to the elbows in the blood of others. And most enigmatic of all, the great Christopher Marlowe, who history tells us was slain in a pointless tavern brawl in Deptford just as his genius was beginning to transform world theatre. Chadbourn's book portrays him as a reluctant spy in a grubby world and sheds new light upon his death. Absolutely riveting reading.

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